To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee Lee I just loved this book. It is about Scout's father defending an African American man against rape charges. It took place in Alabama around 1935. This book really made me think. There were three specific areas that I wondered about and researched.1) One passage where Atticus is discussing the verdict of Guilty with his son, Jem. Atticus specifies that it is a fact that Tom was convicted. Jem insisted that it wasn't right though. Atticus agrees with Jem. I am also reading [b:Les Misérables|24280|Les Misérables|Victor Hugo|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1327702573s/24280.jpg|3208463] and came upon a passage that speaks about right and facts not getting along. This book written with so many years between them, and speaking so profoundly of the same thing.2) I had questions about what the "Ladies Law" was. :D I had to research this because I had never heard of it. The "Ladies' Law" states: "Any person who enters into, or goes sufficiently near to the dwelling house of another, and, in the presence or hearing of the family of the occupant thereof, or any member of his family; or any person who, in the presence or hearing of any girl or woman, uses abusive, insulting, or obscene language, must, on conviction, be fined not more than two hundred dollars, and may also be imprisoned in the county jail, or sentenced to hard labor for the county for not more than six months." THE CODE OF ALABAMA, Vol. III -- CRIMINAL [Nashville, Tenn.: Marshall and Bruce Company, 1907], p. 272.]3) Finally I had questions about the NRA - National Recovery Act. What it was and what it was for. The NRA Blue Eagle label dates from 1933-1935 only. It was a voluntary program covering many consumer goods and was initiated by FDR. It was declared unconstitutional in 1935. This really reminds me of Obamacare in ways. The NRA codes were an unconstitutional delegation of legislative power and was deemed to violate the Constitution because it regulated commerce within sovereign states.This book was consuming and really made me think.